Library Lady's Corner

Book Review - "Entry Points: A Guide to Rudolf Steiner's 'Study of Man'" December 08 2017

Entry Points: A Study Guide to Rudolf Steiner’s Study of Man

In 2003-2004, when eBooks were launched, before any test marketing or forethought, and eBook readers were “the new best thing” with Nooks and Kindles competing for the “best Christmas present of the year,” the word was that books were a thing of the past. Books were so “yesterday.” But books are holding steady.  Maybe it is because reading a book holds an 85% comprehension and retention rate while reading eBooks (any screens, really), comprehension drops to 34% on average.


Book Review: Towards the Deepening of Waldorf Education October 19 2017

In the 1980s and early 1990s, The Pedagogical Section Council of North America worked closely with the Pedagogical Section in Dornach, Switzerland, to develop a publication that gathered the esoteric material Rudolf Steiner gave to the Waldorf teachers in the first Waldorf school in his first training lectures and along the way at teachers’ meetings. The book was beautiful and lovingly compiled.  It had a linen hard cover with gold leafing for the title.

How Do Children Learn to Write and to Read? October 13 2017

Literacy has been made an urgent issue in the last decade. As parents and teachers, we worry, often deeply. Back in the 1900s, we didn’t worry so desperately. Dr. Seuss’s Cat in the Hat, and T.V.’s “Sesame Street” were ever present to reassure us that ways were there for children to learn to read. Maybe these extrinsic tools for children to learn to read and copy writing laid the foundations for the worry — if these tools did not do the trick, perhaps there was something wrong with the child.

Book Review: Award Winning "Helping Children on Their Way" August 16 2017

Waldorf Publications is proud to be recognized by Mom’s Choice Awards with Helping Children on Their Way

Elizabeth Auer has assembled a remarkable group of educators to write about many aspects of supporting children in their different and varied “stuck places” along the road to a balanced development for life.


Summertime and the Livin’ is Easy — and the Reading is Fantastic July 08 2017

At this time of year being a teacher looks like a good career. After all, teachers “get the summer off!”  Sure, they don’t have to show up at school every day, and sure they can wear shorts and sandals instead of dresses and collared shirts. However, once school ends, once reports are completed and meetings subside, the energetic work of preparation begins.

Through books galore, teachers travel to exotic lands from times gone by — India, Persia, Mesopotamia, Egypt and Greece if you are a rising fifth or tenth grade teacher — back in time to the reformation in Europe and the many wars around the world in the last 150 years if you are a rising eighth or ninth grade teacher — ‘round the world for the first conscious time with Magellan (was it worth it when so many died along the way?) if seventh grade will be you destination in the fall — back to the land of stories from before recorded history if you are starting as a first grade teacher — and lost in a miraculous world of new life in embryology if you are a twelfth grade teacher.

To be ready for classes in autumn, the reading is varied and enormous in volume.


Book Review: The Seven Core Principles of Waldorf Education ~ New Release June 24 2017

The Pedagogical Section Council of North America has produced for us another beautiful book to help in understanding the esoteric basis of Waldorf Education,
The Seven Core Principles of Waldorf Education
(Waldorf Publications, 2017, 124 pages, $24).

The Pedagogical Section Council developed the seven, essential elements that make a school truly a Waldorf school.  Pedagogical Section Council members then took up elaborating on each of these principles, the essays written were published in the Research Bulletin over a couple of years, and then the essays were gathered with a few additional treatises on the principles and made into this fine book explaining what makes a Waldorf school a Waldorf school.

Book Review: The Falconer June 11 2017

by Christopher Sblendorio - reviewed by Ronald Koetzsch


In Waldorf schools, history is taught largely through the medium of biography. The life stories of individual human beings, famous and not so famous, good and not so good, are told by the teacher or read in books. Each life, interesting in itself, illuminates the events and conditions of the time in which the person lived.

 

 

 

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Can Morality be Taught? June 08 2017

A generation ago, the children's magazine Highlights for Children had in every issue, in addition to stories, activities, and crafts, a regular section called "Goofus and Gallant." The names of these two brothers always proved prophetic. Goofus consistently did the impolite, uncivil, "wrong" thing, while Gallant always did the kind, considerate, "right" thing. While Goofus slammed the door on those coming behind him, Gallant gallantly held it open. This section was one of my favorites. I found the vignettes quite funny, but I also found them, in terms of their obvious intent, not especially convincing.     Read More
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Math and Arithmetic in a Waldorf School May 24 2017

Sums Dorothy HarrerChildren learn arithmetic in school.  Most of what we call “math” is arithmetic — the skills of computation and calculation.  When we do addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, times tables, square roots, calculating area — for examples — we are doing arithmetic.  Arithmetic is a division or department of mathematics.  Geometry, algebra, and calculus are other branches of mathematics.

Teaching children skills in arithmetic tends to be a cause of anxiety in our culture. Comparative studies accomplished in the latter part of the last century, comparing the attitudes of Japanese parents and American parents about arithmetic skills was revealing.  Read More

 

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Book Review: Difficult Children – There is No Such Thing May 16 2017

Today "difficult children"—children with attention deficit disorder, high levels of anxiety, restlessness, aggressiveness, and other emotional and behavioral problems — are a major challenge for parents, educators. and therapists. Once the child has been diagnosed and labeled as having ADD or autism or some other condition, the standard approach is to use psychotherapy and/or psychotropic drugs to change behavior. Millions of children today, for example, take the drug Ritalin for attention deficit disorder and hyperactivity.   Continue reading...

 


Coming Soon– Several New Waldorf Publications on the Way! May 05 2017

Check out the new titles arriving just in time for summer reading!

Book Reviews: Active Arithmetic! and Math Lessons for Elementary Grades April 28 2017

Are you concerned about your child’s math skills?  Are you wondering how to bring a math idea to your class in an unusual, memorable way?  These books are indispensable! Perhaps the best thing about these books is that they turn your mind from the drier approaches to teaching arithmetic, and open the faucet of your own imaginative ideas for teaching math.

Traditional Tales Retold by Kelly Morrow April 20 2017

Lazy Jack; King Thrushbeard; The Prince and the Dragon; and Sylvain and Jocosa

When class teacher Kelly Morrow’s search for first readers appropriate and challenging for her students proved fruitless, she created her own. The four little books range from 18 to 38 pages. Each book tells a folk story in a simple, clear, but interesting way, and each story is enriched by a moral truth. The cover of each is an engaging color illustration, and there are black and white drawings throughout.


Waldorf Publications and WECAN Form a More Perfect Union February 26 2017

Here in the land of publishing it’s not always easy to tell what is happening beyond the borders of a completed book process. During the journey of publishing a book there are proposals from authors, committee decisions about those proposals, backs-and-forths with authors, decisions about the age range of the book’s usefulness, permissions from other publishers, decisions about illustrations where needed, layouts, font choices, size of the book, cover decisions, edits, proofreading, biographies of authors, sometimes translation issues, and then the actual lining up for printing of the book before going to press.       Read More...


Groundhog Day or Candlemas? February 02 2017

In the mighty Celtic calendar, the year is marked by the two solstices and the two equinoxes. At the Winter Solstice, the days are the shortest of the year; at the Summer Solstice, the days are the longest of the year. At the Autumn Equinox and the Spring Equinox the days are exactly as long as the nights.

The days that mark the halfway mark between these four celestial events are traditionally named “cross-quarter days” as they are the between the quarters markers.


There’s No Minute Like the Last Minute! December 16 2016

Waldorf Publications and the Research Institute for Waldorf Education have many fine possibilities for thoughtful gifts when thoughtfulness in the hectic season becomes hard to muster.

Consider the caliber and depth of some of these gifts — remember, books and subscriptions keep giving long into the future!